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20100930
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'll be talking about maintaining resiliency and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. a. thomas mclennan, deputy director, white house office of national drug control policy, washington, d.c.; dr. alexandre laudet, addiction and recovery scientist, new york, new york; james smallwood, founder and ceo, the choice is yours, inc., camden, new jersey. pam, how many people in the united states are in recovery? well, the estimates are about 20 million people are in recovery, working on being free of drugs and other-and alcohol. and, alexandre, what is recovery? what are some of the common paths to recovery? well, that's really two different questions. what recovery is, according to people in recovery themselves, is usually, especially for people severely addicted, it is abstinence from drugs and alcohol, as well as significantly-significant improvements in other aspects that constitute quality of life, such as employment, soc
america, and they made the ultimate sacrifice for us. as we transfer this treasure, this island, from the navy back to the city, i hope that all of us will remember the service and sacrifice of every sailor, every marine, living and dead. [applause] and the people who left from here and the people who serve today, risking everything, so that we can celebrate today. that legacy lives on in the young men and women who wear the cloth of this country and who are deployed around the world as we meet here today. when the famous or infamous bates 3 aligning closure process started in 1988, a final result of any individual base closure and transfer could not have hoped for a better ultimate outcome than what has been achieved in treasure island. the navy's charge is to dispose of property in a manner that promotes economic development. that has been done. the transfer of treasure island is a win for san francisco. it is a win for the state of california, a win for the united states navy, and a win for the american taxpayers who paid for this base and all the infrastructure that was here. beca
it hard for people to stop using drugs and alcohol-it disrupts their lives, it disrupts their families, it disrupts their living situations, their friends. so i think some of the principles have to do with all of those things. there's many paths to recovery. so just as every human being is individual, their path to getting there is individual. there are principles about getting your life back, and that's why what alexandre said is so important-is that recovery has to do with all of those aspects of life. james, you've been there, along the path to recovery. you want to share with us some of your experiences? well, my experience has been that in-in-in the addiction itself, we're addicted to a drug, to a substance, and that the-the problem with that is that there's a problem within us that causes us to want to use a substance to hide from that-from-from, hide from the problem. and that my path was that there was a problem in me that i'd never took a look at. and so i chose to use crack, whatever it was, or other substances to-to medicate that, until i came to the point to realize that i
you want to share with us some of your experiences? well, my experience has been that in-in-in the addiction itself, we're addicted to a drug, to a substance, and that the-the problem with that is that there's a problem within us that causes us to want to use a substance to hide from that-from-from, hide from the problem. and that my path was that there was a problem in me that i'd never took a look at. and so i chose to use crack, whatever it was, or other substances to-to medicate that, until i came to the point to realize that i was sick and tired of being sick and tired of following that path, of living that way which had led me to homelessness and other things like that, that i said well, you know, what can i do? and at that point i had very little answers. but as-as-as my word says, i just needed the faith of a mustard seed to realize that i couldn't do it, if somebody else could do it, so i-i-i walked many, many miles to a rehab center. what was that aha moment? you know there usually comes a moment along the path of someone that has an addiction that finally-you k
that involves talking to us, and more important, listening to us, hearing our voices. so many have worked so hard, has you have been told -- as you have been told, to bring the state to pass. and now we have a dazzling new setting to present to you. when you leave today, you will be going home. but laguna honda residents will not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new laguna honda would not exist without you. i just want to add a personal note. my younger sister, emily, was a resident here for many more years than i have been. she was greatly loved. we lost her recently. i would like to dedicate this speech to her and remembered her, as many of the residents do, with great fondness and affection. thank you all. [applause] >> i would like to invite you all nowi that good enough? this is a participatory ribbon cutting. it requires nothing more complicated than this. i will ask you to count down, not up. upon conclusion, we will applaud the great works of turner construction, the dedicat
water intensive and the restoration may not have that same use. thank you for the discussion. thank you for your time for conserving water. >> hello, i'm a resident of san francisco and i'm concerned because we would like to authorize a general manager to negotiate a memorandum of understanding with the parks department for the delivery and application of recycled water. i don't oppose using recycled water in place of drinking water for non drinking uses. the substitution must be. this would be designated for a golf course. we have no resolution on the future of the park. the san francisco public utility commission should not authorize the commission. in the public utilities commission should insure that the water is constructed and the delivery contracts negotiated or require you to deliver this to other uses. it is important that the contracts include other uses for the water including when the future of the park is not yet determined. i have a letter from the alliance. "dear commissioners, this is a request that the commission delayed a decision about the project. we did not support
, yahoo maps. microsoft. those are examples of on line mapping systems that can be used to find businesses or get driving directions or check on traffic conditions. all digital maps. >> gis is used in the city of san francisco to better support what departments do. >> you imagine all the various elements of a city including parcels and the critical infrastructure where the storm drains are. the city access like the traffic lights and fire hydrants. anything you is represent in a geo graphic space with be stored for retrieval and analysis. >> the department of public works they maintain what goes on in the right-of-way, looking to dig up the streets to put in a pipe. with the permit. with mapping you click on the map, click on the street and up will come up the nchgz that will help them make a decision. currently available is sf parcel the assessor's application. you can go to the assessor's website and bring up a map of san francisco you can search by address and get information about any place in san francisco. you can search by address and find incidents of crime in san francisco in t
us, but we will also support you. we are going to do the right thing. we are going to make sure we spend your money wisely, and this is what it will cost. all the experts agree this is what it will cost. not anymore. we do not necessarily know how to make it any less, but here is an actual number, and the results speak for themselves. 84% of the people supported the biggest general obligation bond in our city's history because they thought, i think, respected. they felt like city government was telling them the truth. there was no opposition to this bond because you could not oppose it unless you did not want to spend any more money. but you could not argue against the analysis. you could not argue against the due diligence, and i think that is an important lesson. i think this day represents an important statement of fact and commitment to the people of san francisco, that they will support things we could never have imagined supporting as long as we tell them the truth, as long as we are honest with people, as long as we are transparent, as long as we owned up, so i am extraordin
is the excessive beer and wine sales as opposed to -- beyond 15%. not the other uses such as permitted uses such as takeout food and food served on the premises and the fountain. >> the restaurant portion does appear to be operating within the parameters set by the commission in 2007. the grocery store is not. the wine sales has exceeded the area that is permitted and the grocery part, -- the 2007 action was in part to preserve that grocery store. if we do this and this we can still sell the groceries. but they didn't. they went on and put in the restaurant and the wine sales but they did not really develop the grocery portion. the other concern is the facade and i realize that a lot of people like the facade the way it is now however the building is a historic resource and has been determined to be that by the department. and to change the facade in the way they have really takes away the historic character of that building. it had a very distinctive facade of its period and the improvements that they made, granted they were extensive and expensive went in the opposite direction of what th
feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 years ago -- things have changed quite a bit. we believe this would bring increased vitality to the neighborhood, increased spending in the city that would help overall -- the overall economy. when we look at the political will, we look at financing options and opportunities to take next that's. the best opportunity is mosconi east in 2008. that would be a perfect time live from what we believe meets the demand that is growing at the moment. the last thing i want to talk about his proposition j, the proposition to increase the hotel tax. it increases it two points, 14%. it just went up 13% two years ago, so we would have a 25% increase in hotel taxes in just a few years. it i
transit use. the biggest consternation is the fact elimination of vehicle lanes is not stopped the constant constant double parking for loading and unloading of commercial vehicles. those of you who know manhattan, much of the area we are talking about is along broadway. there are deliveries anywhere from two in the morning until 2:00 the next morning. the throughput that has been acclaimed by a the new york transit authority. this is a very interesting experiment. the plazas are well used. the bike lanes are much more used. this seems to be more bikers or least they are more apparent. >> i have met with the project's sponsors and spoke with a couple of the d.r. requesters. >> mr. president, i have been informed that the city attorney has obtained the signatures needed for item number five. >> [inaudible] >> second. >> is any public comment >> item 5? >> aye. >> aye. >> aye. >> aye. >> we are now at directors report, directors announcements. >> welcome back from break. i guess the only thing have to do is look could be barred from the summer hiatus. fall is already coming on wi
>> good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us. it is my pleasure to be here with our regional fta administrator and our commissioner from san francisco who sits on the metropolitan transportation commission. we have a new development in terms of the muni metro system, one of which is the beginning of the card installation system. we have nine stations that will be receiving newgate's. and we will be adding another 19 disabled fare gates. what we are attempting to do here is replace the infrastructure that has well tapped is useful life in terms of our fair gates, and we are cobbling that at the same time with a nuclear program, which you all should be aware of and which is the regional smart card that will be used throughout the area for public transit trips in the region. the new ticket vending machines -- we have purchased 40 of those ticket vending machines. customers should be able to go to any metro station and purchase tickets that can be used on all of the systems in the metro region. they are multi-lingual machines. they speak in english as well as spanish and
viable, the better off we are. in san francisco there's more dogs than children. finding a viable use for dog poop. >> proenvironmental policies, that's a way to win hearts and minds. >> good evening i am the director of the culture association and devoted to the program and here we have master of arts. (applause). (speaking spanish) (speaking spanish). >> what he is saying that thanks to the bant. bante he got funding for of the peru vaifian culture and got approved. >> (speaking spanish). >> okay. >> good. (speaking spanish). >> so we have a variety of instruments -- that we're going to be showing you. >> (speaking spanish). >> the name of the instrument is called tale boheha. >> (speaking spanish). >> it was a time in peru when the africans were prohibited from playing or making instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they were forced to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make
, that might necessitate us gearing up to do a fairly major effort of our own. i was wondering where that stood. >> we have worked with our agencies and provided some analyses. then we shared copies of a few samples of the results with mr. harington and his staff and came forward with no consensus recommendation from those agencies. now it is in steve's court. >> i forgot to load the presentation on the computer, so i was working. we received those examples from the bawsca customers and subsequent to that took a shot at interim supply allocation to the customers, distributing the craft form. we found out talking about these opposing concepts, nobody said anything. we now have feedback and numbers out there. we did have a meeting about two weeks ago with the customers to get feedback on that. we are working now on producing a revised draft written about and get more feedback on with the anticipation we would bring that forward to you on november 9 with perhaps not a formal recommendation but to get any policy guides, and come back on december 14 for adoption prior to the december 31 deadline. co
more than able to be used. so as far as your personal kind of use and the public that is used to getting hard copies, none of that is going to change because i'm sure just by sheer force of inertia and print a number of copies of documents just to have available for people that will ultimately request them and that is perfectly fine. it is the frivolous thing that people getting them that don't request them and we are trying to avoid and if you want to send it to us electronically, we are more than happy to review it online. president miguel: as many of us here will probably remember, when we heard the phrase that computers were going to do away with paper, that's not going to happen. and in some instances i think there's more paper now because of computers perhaps than there was before. and as commissioner sugaya was saying, i have a very, very difficult time comparing sections and comparing alternatives by trying to flip through a document electronically. probably because i came into the field much later in life than my grandchildren did perhaps. so i am not as adept at it,
who uses the oil and dive into safety by the middle of 2011. we are delighted to be able to use this opportunity. back in october, we had a ground-breaking ceremony for the project as a whole. we had the speaker of the house nancy pelosi with us. the mayor was here, other dignitaries. at the time, we were looking at the oil drive -- doyle drive. we now have a different project for the 21st century. it is an example of what partnership and inventiveness and the full participation of the amazing community of san francisco residents can do to create a project that is really worthy of the amazing natural setting of the presidio park, the largest urban park in the park system. let me start by making some acknowledgements. we have some speakers who i will introduced in a moment, but i am very pleased to welcome to the event, dan representing the speaker's office. i would also like to have very much thank christine from senator feinstein's office, as well as mega miller, a field representative team for senator boxer. in that knowledge and then come i want to the knowledge and leadershi
glass on mission street in san francisco with mr. ken paige. ken paige has generously invited us into his glass shop and gallery. and the paige glass goes back a long, long time, right? to preearthquake, whichever earthquake -- >> all of them. they're all good. >> when did paige glass start? >> the big one, 1906. >> this happened afs in your family, was paige glass back then? >> well, the 1906 was a very important year, of course, for san francisco, needless to say. the bad news was the death and destruction, city in flames. the good news for my grandfather was even though he was living, at that point, in a tent out in golden gate park, you know, one of a whole lot of people. the good news, he was a young glazer, and every window in the city was broken. >> a holy grail of glazing. >> [laughter.] >> so at that point, shortly after the tremors sopped, he said wait a minute, i've got this idea. so paige glass really started in 1906, with that quake. >> wow. >> and he was so busy, he didn't really form an actual company-company, a registered company till 1910. i think that was the fi
tiffany. in 2007 when the applicants came forward to have their vision, the principle and conditional use would be for a retail grocery. there were going to be accessry uses like a wine shop and also a catering business like a self service restaurant they also cater out of. what happened is that they went ahead and put stuff on the shelf and in the freezers that one, people did not buy because they just did not participate or it was stuff on the shelf that people did not want so they did not come in and buy it. ultimately they threw a lot of the stuff away. and they adjusted their business model. their big mistake is that they should have came forward and said this is not practical. it is not pragmatic. they should get a new principle use, self service restaurant and wine shop. and something very unique open space in an enclosed area where people can get together. that, to me, is very practical. we are in the year 2010. they are running out of money. there is no more cushion. they put $2.1 million into a building which i thank you for, prior to that it was a complete eye sore. and it is p
with a mixed use development, which would be a unique public-private partnership. it would be a tremendous opportunity to expand mosconi and improve the neighborhood. it would improve the entrance to the neighborhood on third street. right now, stoney is a very unattractive entry into san francisco -- mosconi is a very unattractive entry into san francisco. the other would be the north-sow 3 configuration, which would require excavating under howard street, which would have done when we first built mosconi south. it would have only cost $3 million. connect north and south and make it one large exhibit space. that would provide the total exhibition space between 500,000 square feet and 600,000 square feet. that sounds big but that only puts us in competition with a city like san diego. you have hotels in las vegas that have 1 million square feet of exhibition space. even with both of these projects. -- even with both of these projects, we are still small. these things could not only help to continue the revitalization of neighborhoods -- and those of you who remember this neighborhood 30 ye
all know, the german marshall fund vehicle very kind to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we
at all of us who were able to be here tonight to celebrate this particular month in this particular fashion -- clearly, one-third of us living in the city of san francisco are asian- americans and pacific islanders. that is why it is so important to know that our voices count, and our boys in a celebration like this counts as we lead the nation in a great celebration. right now, i would like to call upon the san francisco assessor, bill ping, who is here to present the city's proclamation from our mayor of sentences go. i would like you all to say come on up bill. thank you for being here with us. give him a warm welcome. he is our san francisco assessor, bill ping. [applause] >> thank you, jan. can i ask some other commissioners to join me on stage? i know that commissioners mar and chu are here. if there are other elected officials, if you could join me. our community in san francisco is something we are extremely proud of. frankly, if it was not for all of you i do not think any of us would be standing up here. we are very honored to be representing the community and the richness
recycling at home and use these bins you see behind me. i do not want this to become a psa for our recycling efforts, although that is always good, and remember, it is the kids teaching the adults, which is always good. but this is good for the environment, good for the economy, and a san francisco can do this, cities across california and cities across america can do this. i will remind you of the great line by michelangelo, who said that the biggest risk is not that we aim to hawaii and miss but that we aim to low and --. it would have been easy for us to have a goal of 50% recycling rate by 2020. a lot of states, a lot of cities across the state, that will be tow%8x4ç:vw1qs8mna ++%uq when you do that, you get people to organize that quality of imagination, where people in the private sector and public sector, using the entrepreneurial and innovative spirit coming up with new ideas and attitudes that may seem untoward or a little controversial or extreme at first, but suddenly, when you peel it back and look back two or three years, you go, "my gosh, that makes so much since." if you make
for the dead and waste and taxes left to us by labour. we can put behind us the economic incompetence, the breakdown, the political division, and the mistrust. of course, i hope that a conservative majority would be the outcome of this election and that we could have started today making the changes that i believe our country so badly needs. i know how much the conservative party itself -- all my colleagues in parliament, all the members and activists from the country -- wanted that as well, but i also know they wanted something more than that. they want the best for britain. the conservative party has always been a party that puts the national interest first, and the best thing, the national interest, the best thing for britain now is a new government that works together in the national interest, and i hope with all my heart that is something we can achieve. that is all i have to say for now. i hope you understand, but i will not be taking questions because this urgent work must begin. thank you. >> we leave the british leader's speeches. you can find them in their entirety at c-span
us to overcome many of the challenges that we have faced, as you will hear throughout the program. part of what makes today so sweet is it was not easy to get here. it was really hard. there were a lot of bumps on the road to this fantastic moment, many things we could not have anticipated, many things we did not know. throughout it, the mayor has always supported it, help us to solve the problems we face. i think the biggest part of the to be to him is the fact that this is the first leed building -- the environmental certification -- the first leed hospital in california to be built. i think that really speaks to his commitment to environmental issues at a time, 12 years ago, when it was not so popular, and it seemed like a quixotic kind of adventure to be talking about it. he said it was real. he was right. now people talk about it as a day to day economic reality. mr. mayor? >> thank you, doctor, and thank you all for taking the time to be here today. to begin with, i would like to recognize a couple of people. one person whose spirit is here, but whose sisters took the time t
and figuring out the ways they can use the packing facilities for canning the tomatoes from the local farmer and having the delivery come to the university. and if they can be doing that research on it, then sharing that is a beautiful thing. >> couple of questions, has it been difficult to spread your philosophy to urban communities and what solutions, more specifically, can you offer to help education poor communities and support those students? if money is used as the excuse and easily used in declining resources, how do we realistically break through? >> we start growing things on every available lot. >> i wasn't joking. just think of what happened during world war ii. i grew up on my parent's victory garden. they were asked to do this as a part of the war effort. they saved all of their tin cans. they kept their milk cartons. they turned out the lights. it is the way you were brought up. it is free food when you grow it. every time i see a vacant lot, i think my god, how much food can be grown. there are beautiful people doing research on ecology action with john jevens. how much food c
to get us through this day. i thank you. to the development team. to the residents of this island that have been patient beyond imagination. with the hope and expectation we would get to this point. to all those that are looking forward to the ground breaking to be hosted some time next year. it is pretty remarkable -- this is a small city, and about 10% of our land happens to be on three principal areas. all three of them former naval bases. out there in hunters point. the army out on presidio, and here on treasure island. 25-plus-hundred acres in the '70s -- the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. since then, we have been talking about revitalization. we have been talking about reconstituting these pieces of property. just two weeks ago i had the pleasure and privilege of signing 12 pieces of legislation, marking over the course of over two decades over the course of hunters point. creating a framework on an economic development framework for 10,500 new housing units, 32% of them below market. hundreds of thousands of square feet of new retail space. yes, a new stadium for somebody someday
, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you believe
specifically a third fast-food restaurant in the center but it was only to be used as a bakery. >> and why does chipolte fit into the use as a fast-food restaurant such as pizza hut did? is it the difference in the type of food? what other types of restaurants can go in? >> it is narrowly drawn and that only applies to the large fast food. the restaurant they were referring to may not have been a large fast food. only this par space. >> ok. >> i would certainly think that miss jones as representatives of lakeshore plaza has listened well to the comments of the various neighborhood organizations and i and here stand them. in defense of the plaza or in defense of business in general, might i say in 21 years the concept of individual restaurants verses fast food has greatly changed. all individual russia wants in -- restaurants in areas that are not heavily trafficked have a very difficult time to survive. this is a fast-food restaurant which is not a derogatory term, by the way. those of the ones that survive in these locations. also in 1989, the process by which this4hñ departm
>> good afternoon. we are very forge to have with -- "fortune" to vo with us some guests who are going to speaking to us about balconies and problems and what maintenance issues you should be paying to. we have dave from lynnagain, associates from what you normally would call a termite inspector. it's actually a structural pest control company. is that right? >> that's right. >> we'll talk more about what license pest control folks do and why it's so important to know them and to know dave. and a structural engineer who looks at lots of decks and balconies and tries to figure out ways to fix and solve problems. and sometimes looks at the reasons that problems occur and called in to do the forensic investigation of that failure as well. and of course, harvey is here with pat. thanks for joining us, harvey. and i'm chief building inspect, lawrence cornfield. we have a bunch of slides we're going to go through today that i hope will give us sort of a basis to ask questions and focus our discussion. most of the decks that we see that we're going to talk about are made of wood. sa
members, the elected officials. come up to the party and stay here with us. >> who says asians don't have rhythm? that's it,on't have rhythm? that's it, ladies and gentlemen, for the kickoff performance for asian-pacific american heritage month. thank you very much for coming. we hope to see you at the reception. good night! >> weren't they great? i think they deserve another round of your thanks. they are thurgood marshall high school like school crew. -- light show crew. they were formed to demonstrate asian culture through the art of glow sticks. glow sticks are synonymous with the buyer dancing from hawaii. they did a great job with those close sticks. -- with those glow stick. i am going to serve as your mc. the first rule of thumb i get to ask of all of you is please turn off your cell phones. we would really appreciate it if you could check right now to see that yourself bones are on silent mode are completely off. -- that your cell phones are completely off or on silent mode. we have some great performances coming up. they deserve your attention. we ask you the favor to che
usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer here. all of you had a role in creating that facility we are so pr
help us in an ongoing way for the board by setting up some way of communicating with us by e-mail, letting us know what is going on. i would particularly interested in those professional development opportunities, and some advice for when you think it might be helpful if we are available to show up to show support. i do not think it is appropriate for board farmers to be at all the meetings you have -- all board members to be at all the meetings you have. not only do i want to see how this is working and the potential implications, but also i think it is important for the people working at these schools to understand how important we think this is. if you can in the coming weeks figure out a way to do that, give us some advice. i would appreciate that. >> we would be glad to do that. commissioner yee: thanks for the report. i have been anxious to hear about these for a while now. a couple of things that would be helpful for me -- i would like to get an update of the organizational chart. i know you have given some organizational charts before, but it would be nice when i am w
elements. that is why i'm here -- to give thanks and gratitude for all the work hard to get us here. i want to thank those just once again, the secretary, for his willingness to think differently and look differently at this project. this project was dead many many times, but it was because of his willingness to look at this in a new light and consider things that previous secretaries of the navy had not considered because of the great work of his staff and both the department of defense and because, more importantly, of the incredible commitment, not just passing interest, speaker ned to pelosi, who started this thing through three presidential administrations, secretaries of navy, mayors like me that come and go, members of the board of supervisors, treasure island development authority that stuck it out for all this time. to nancy pelosi, thank you yet again. what a remarkable effort. you deserve an enormous amount of credit. we thank you. we are proud of you. this is a big deal. on top of that, hunters point, which was a big deal. trans a terminal, doyle drive, the bay bridge. t
us. today is a major milestone in our sf park program. it is a new system of managing parking in the city and county of san francisco. the mta was fortunate enough to receive a $25 million partnership grant to look at ways to help with congestion in urban cities and find a way to do with pricing. rather than looking at toll booths and things of that nature, we thought it would be a more elegant solution to look at where the cars are going better actually trying to park. by making parking easier and getting better data, we believe we will have a strategy that will reduce congestion on city streets. over 30% of the contestant dickcongest -- congestion is related to automobiles looking for parking. we want to provide better data in terms of the sensors on the street. they will have a real time information needed for 511, through the website, or through their smart phones to receive information as to where parking is available in the city. the parking will be made available because we're going to properly priced the parking in the city. by having these smart readers, we will be ab
immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. immigration rates started about 40 years ago and i started to see my client to come to me. my husband has been here 10 years and all of a sudden, his employer is asking for a work permit. we have two children. we just bought a home. what are we going to do? i could not provide a work
and reflect on his contribution. let us also take a moment to reflect on the doctor. we are blessed. you do not want to be the best of the best. you want to be only the one who does what you do. his commitment to public health in san francisco is second to none. he has done an extraordinary job leading by example. this is a city that is doing things that no other city in the united states of america could even imagine doing, things that even when we had all the resources in the world and all the capacity, things that cities could not do. this commitment to an acute care, facility, a skilled nursing facility -- what county is having a ribbon cutting on a new nursing facility in this modern age? and what city and county can lay claim to comprehensive universal health care, regardless of pre- existing conditions, regardless of your ability to pay? dr. mitch kastz has been the architect of all of this. thank you for your leadership. there is the old play towline that if there is any hope for the future of those with lanterns will pass them on to others. let me talk about those that carry bright
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